Working with lazy people

Its always boggled me how lazy some people can be when there’s one thing that no one wishes to do.

There’s a cardboard baler where I work.  Since the vast majority of the products that we get in are packed in corrugated cardboard, the baler gets quite a workout day to day.  When it’s full, it needs to be shut down, opened, wires run through it, tied off, and the machine spits out the bale once chains are attached to the compressing ram.  The bale falls onto a wooden pallet, the pallet is put on a trailer destined for the warehouse and the whole process begins anew.  The recurring problem lies with who gets to make the bale.  None of the department people want to do it.  They’d rather fill up the baler and leave it for someone else to take care of.  As a matter of fact, on a day like today, those same people filled the baler to a such a degree, it was nearly impossible to get the bale made safely.

On one of my trips to the baler Tuesday morning, I encountered the deli manager throwing her cardboard into the already overfilled machine.  She looked up at me and said “Looks like a bale needs to be made” and proceeded to walk off.  I called out to her rather loudly “the baling wire is right over there, if you wish to give me a hand WE can make one…” and she turned, shook her head and walked off, not a care in the world.

It’s not my responsibility to make a bale.  But I certainly know how.  I learned many years ago, and have taught countless people how to do it.  It’s pretty simple, and a single person can do it alone if they’re careful.  The sheer number of people that work there and have zero interest in something that would help literally everyone else just boggles me.  It makes no sense to me whatsoever.  Of course, the worst offender is the one person that you would think would have the most to gain by helping out is the store manager.  One day the baler was full, I went to move the pallets of water out of the way while he was in the back room, and he asked me what I was doing.  I told him I needed to make a bale and could use some help.  He recommended I get someone else.  I replied he was available, since he was only using a broom to clean the back room.  Needless to say, he gave me a withering look and in one of the most condescending tones I’ve ever heard from someone in his position might have, he said very plainly “I don’t make bales.”

At that point, I didn’t tell him what I was thinking.  Anything I might have said at that juncture would have more than likely involved not only the union steward (the aforementioned deli manager) and/or our union rep.  So best left unsaid.

It doesn’t take a lot to be helpful.  We get pounded into our heads daily that ‘Customer Service’ is a priority.  Well helping out your fellow employees is a good thing as well.  Pity that it’s so far down on everyone’s to-do list.