One Down, One to Go

Ah, Thanksgiving is finally here. Unlike the masses that shop in the store I work at, I’m thankful the holiday is here, rather than it’s still in the offing, so we can get past it and on to the last holiday of the year, and be done with 2020, as well as the ‘silly season’.

I suppose in a way it’s a symptom of getting older.  The more years I put on, the less I’m up for all the pomp and circumstances of the holidays, and more interested in getting them over and done with and behind me.  Christmas I suppose is pretty much the only holiday that I’m ok with tolerating, because it has elements that to me are enjoyable still and I can revel in, to some extent.  The music, some of the pagentry, the decorations (as long as they don’t get too ostentatious) and the memories things invoke, are more tolerable to me than the trappings of Thanksgiving.  To me, Thanksgiving reminds me of the year my mother died, and how that situation invariably ruined the holiday for me.

Too, the whole bastardization of the holiday is sort of off-putting, given how it was created in the first place.  Commercialization does have a way of making things less palatable, or perhaps dumbed down for the people that wish to have it simple, rather than understanding how it all began.  Thanksgiving was a holiday to allow people in the 19th century to be appreciative of what they had, to hearken back to a time when things were perhaps more dire and remember that there had been much progress in the 200 years since the pre-beginning of the US.  

Abraham Lincoln was the President that cemented the last Thursday of November as the ‘official’ Thanksgiving, in a time when there was a Civil War (hardly civil in many respects) raging in the southern part of the divided country.   There had been other days of ‘Thanksgiving’ or of memorializing the concept of being thankful for what the country had, or the citizenry of same possessed, or ‘had’ at that time.  With the unrest and armies mowing down each other en masse, it was necessary to refocus, or redirect the citizens into something peaceful, something to take away the horrors of the war that was tearing the country asunder.

Today, it’s all about retail.  Buying the right turkey at a reduced price, having to purchase the trappings to go along with it (gotta have that dressing, cranberry and pumpkin pie, right?) or if you’re less traditional, getting a ham or rib roast, and all the other sundries that go along with those menu choices.  Even this year, with people not traveling as much due to the pandemic, having to stay home unexpectedly, dragging out cookware that hasn’t been used in years, since they traditionally haven’t been home for the holiday.  I saw a lot of that this year, along with people asking about how to cook things that they like, but have no idea how to actually prepare it themselves. (I had a gentleman who stated he loved prime rib roast, he has it often, but when I got him the size he wanted for him and his wife, just before I turned away, he stopped me and asked how to cook it.  Fortunately, this wasn’t the first time this has happened, so I gave him a basic recipe that I’d seen on Foodwishes.com along with a handout that we have in the department for people that need a little assistance with cooking roasts and so on.)  Apparently not everyone either has an Internet connection or knows how to navigate it to find more than silly cat videos.

My wife and I, we’re celebrating subdued.  I have the day off from work (thank you!) so I don’t have to deal with the brouhaha there on the holiday.  Granted I’ll be working tomorrow for the aftermath, where we’ll be marking down the turkeys that we still have (the fresh ones, the frozen, or partially thawed ones go back in the freezer) and making the department look presentable after having been run from one end to the other for the past two days.  We’re getting a few holiday dinners from a place near us that does catering, the woman has been trying to make her business work with the pandemic, and people not needing catering for events that they cannot host due to restrictions on people gathering together.  You really have to feel for people who had planned for beginning businesses like that, and support them however possible.  So instead of cooking something ourselves, we’re picking up the dinners at 1 this afternoon, storing them in the fridge and having our holiday dinner this evening.  I’m roasting a butternut squash to go with the traditional meal we’re getting, just an addition that my wife and I both like.  Dessert is included, so we don’t have to worry about creating a huge mess in our galley kitchen.  No muss, no fuss and we can have a relaxed evening after.  

So, one holiday down, one to go.  If you made it this far, sorry (not sorry) for the rant.  I hope you and yours have a great holiday.  Enjoy the time you can spend together, if you can use Zoom, Skype or FaceTime (or Google Duo) to connect with your far flung off family, take time to do so.  Which reminds me, I need to FaceTime with my Mom. 

Happy Thanksgiving, 2020.

Hoarding? Or planning ahead

Even though I work in retail, like many I was caught a bit flat-footed when the panic buying hit this Spring.  For several weeks it was touch and go whether or not my wife and I were going to have adequate supplies of our preferred paper products in the house.  Not to mention what became ‘big-ticket’ items like hand sanitizer and hand soap.

Since then, things have gotten a bit better in terms of supplies being in the stores on a more anticipated basis, though paper towels are invariably in short supply as well as limited in variety no matter where you go. 

This week there have been rumblings about a ‘second wave’ of rationing because of the uptick of COVID cases in this area as well as elsewhere.   On our most recent shopping trip, I, being the retail veteran, noticed the signs that have reappeared on certain items in the store, warning shoppers that they’re limited to 1 or 2 of paper towels, toilet paper, peanut butter and other things that have up to now been somewhat plentiful enough to allow almost unlimited buying.

As for myself, in the past couple of months I’ve been upping our supply of paper products as well as other long-term shelf stable items in case of unexpected shortages.  Now some might see that as ‘hoarding’ but I wasn’t buying toilet paper or paper towels 4 and 5 multi-packs at a time.  Nor have I been cleaning out the canned good section regularly.   If anything, it could be said that I’ve been engaging in limited purchases to bolster our bottom line, and permit our neighbors to do the same, all the while not spending any more than we can afford, in order to better survive what’s coming in the next several months. 

Obviously we’re not ogres here.  If a neighbor happened to come to the door and say they needed to ‘borrow’ something we had in abundance, we’d share.   But even so, we’re in a position where it makes sense to plan ahead, and have adequate supplies to get us through if we can, without breaking the bank in the process. 

I actually thought about getting a chest freezer and filling it, but in that retrospect, we’d end up probably not using it correctly and it would become something that would cost more than it was worth.  We eat out enough (take-out) that I’m not exclusively cooking from home, and don’t require large amounts of frozen meat, vegetables and so on.  The small freezer above the refrigerator has been good enough for the past 20 years, it should be enough going forward.  Unless I take a couple of cooking classes and suddenly decide to buy a half a cow that needs to be stored for the long term.  But I don’t see that occurring.

Suffice it to say, I feel better prepared for the next couple of months than I did back in March and April.  And that’s saying something.

Stay the eff home, please?

By now, unless you’ve been living under a rock, you’re aware of the COVID-19/Coronavirus pandemic that’s got the planet in a tizzy.  And when I say tizzy, I mean full-blown panic.  Even while all of this is going on, my job is considered to be ‘essential’ so I’m still going to work every day.  Though, while I’m doing my part to keep the wheels turning and people fed, I still see things that bother me, and many of my co-workers as well.

In retail, one sees many of the same people day in and day out.  Regulars, are what we call them.  You can almost set your clock by the time they arrive, what days and so on.  Some show up every single day, stay for almost the same amount of time, and then you see them the following day.  It seems like nothing is ever going to change their routine.  And in this time of uncertainty, when people are being warned to ‘stay home’, that hasn’t changed their routine one iota.

Every morning, ‘Acadia Lady‘ comes in right around the time I’m starting my shift.  Sometimes I see her in the parking lot on her way out of the store as I’m walking in, but rest assured, within about one to two hours, she’s back in the store, hunched over her cart and tooling around, picking up a few odds and ends that she missed the first time around.

Around about the same time, I see ‘The Shuffler’.  A gentleman of about sixty or so (might be less, a little difficult to tell) who shuffles his right foot as he walks, and goes through the store looking for bargains.  He generally comes in around 8 am, and then in the afternoon he’s back, again seeking out any bargains or reduced merchandise.  I understand money is tight, and a lot of people shop primarily the reduced merchandise in the store.  I don’t have any problem with that (unless they bring me items expecting me to further reduce them, that annoys me to no end) but when I’m required to be in the store, they don’t have to be coming in so often.  There’s a health emergency on.  The governor of the state has instituted a stay at home order.  Is there any logical reason why it’s completely necessary to ignore it?

We’ve already gotten two separate reports in recent weeks that people have come into the store while having symptoms of the virus.  As a matter of fact, on 3/26 one of them went to their doctor, got the test, was determined to be positive and ignoring the directive to ‘go directly home‘ instead on the way home stopped at my store and did some shopping, because they determined they didn’t have enough food and supplies for a two-week stay.  In their mind, apparently it was better to possibly infect anyone they met, just to satisfy their need for snack foods and toilet paper.  Nice move.

And of course there’s more.  The families that come in and shop all clumped together.  Mom, Dad, and the kids.  The directive from the governor says that only ONE person from each family is supposed to be in the store, as little as possible.  Preferably doing the shopping for the week, not every day, or every other day.  Or the elderly husband and wife that have to come in, both of them take a motorized handicap cart, and motor around the store for an hour or more, denying their neighbors use of one, while they get maybe five items between them.  Unreal.  It’s little wonder we get so many complaints that we don’t have enough of them.  Certainly my store has four, which is two more than any of the other stores around us have.

Bottom line, for my sake, for my co-workers’ sake, since you don’t have to be at my store every effing day.  Stay home!

End of rant.